Junior College

Review Essay Of “Jacques de Coutre’s And Matelieff’s Singapore and Johor”: Exploring Sources On Pre-Modern History of Singapore

"The education and awareness of the pre-Rafflesian Singapore history has seen much progress since the turn of the millennium. First, there is the publication of Early Singapore 1300-1819: evidence in maps, text and artefacts and Iberians in the Singapore-Melaka area and adjacent regions: 16th to 18th century in 2004. In 2009, the publication of Singapore: a 700-year history, Sino-Malay trade and diplomacy from the tenth through the fourteenth century and Singapore and Melaka Straits: violence, security and diplomacy in the 17th century provide the general public and the specialists alike a chance to explore the subject comprehensively or delve into the China-Malay Archipelago relations in the post Classical period as well as the relations between European empires and native powers in the Western Malay Archipelago in the early modern period. "

Why Singapore Succeeded: Applying the Acemoglu and Robinson-Sachs Debate

"Why are some nations rich and some poor? Who are the winners and losers of colonialism and why? These questions have recently gained much attention, not only amongst historians but also economists who are now looking into global history to provide a fuller understanding of why and how had nations developed. One of the most recent works was Why Nations Fail by economist Daron Acemoglu and political economist James Robinson."

Impacts of the development of tourist facilities on the transition of villages: A case study of Gubugklakah Village, Malang, Indonesia

"Gubugklakah village is located in eastern Malang, Indonesia. The settlement grows along the main road towards the Bromo Tengger Semeru National Park (TNBTS). This village has high economic potential because of the tourism activities. Lembaga Desa Wisata (LADESTA) is a local community formed in 2009 that initiated the status transition of Gubugklakah into Gubugklakah Tourism Village. This research study focuses on the development of tourist facilities in Gubugklakah. Tourist facilities are categorized as primary, secondary and conditional facilities in order to determine and analyse development since the status of the community changed. The method used was a descriptive spatial analysis based on a field survey that included observations and interviews. The results of this study indicate that the number of primary, secondary and conditional tourist facilities is increasing and the facilities are developed linearly along the main road of TNBTS. Furthermore, secondary facilities established by local people, such as restaurants, hotels, and shopping centres, also help the economy in Gubugklakah Tourism Village."

Negotiating the Role of the (Beginning) Teacher in the Classroom

"Teachers play an important role in enacting the curriculum for their students, but teachers’ classroom practice is affected by a multiplicity of influences. This paper reflects on the role of teachers’ subject knowledge in their practice of geography in Singapore classrooms. In addition, it also applies a post-modern analysis of power to this knowledge-practice relationship, suggesting that many beginning teachers may not be able to draw on their subject knowledge due to other more powerful influences on their teaching."

The “rightful place” of Physical Geography in Singapore’s School Geography Curriculum

"The role of physical geography within geography, its relationship to human geography, as well as its similarities and differences to the study of science have been topics of intense debate in geography. This article engages these debates as they apply to geography education in a highly urban Singapore context and argues that the nexus of physical and human geography provides students with the type of knowledge that best prepares them to be concerned and informed global citizens."

Radicalization of Geographical Education in Singapore through Powerful Knowledge and Powerful Pedagogy

"Debate about the purpose of a geography education is often related to what should be included and emphasised in the curriuclum. This article considers Young’s (2010) conceptualisation of powerful knowledge and reflects on its relationship to pedagogy. More specifically, it considers if students’ knowledge should be part of the formal curriculum."

Concepts as the Grammar of Geography: A Reflection

"Geographical concepts are an important means of organising an otherwise long and unconnected list of geographical places, names and topics, and arguably provide geographers with a “grammar” with which to give order to geographical content. This paper reflects on the usefulness and applicability of such a conceptual approach to teaching geography in the Singapore classroom."

Improving Geographical Thinking in the Classroom with the Curriculum Making Model

"Geography teachers often use curriculum artefact(s) in their lessons to aid students’ learning of content knowledge, concepts or skills. How effectively have artefact(s) been used in such lessons to help students think geographically? This paper demonstrates how an artefact chosen as a resource for a lesson could be evaluated vis-à-vis the Curriculum Making model introduced by the Geographical Association in UK to enhance both teachers’ and students’ ability to think geographically in the classroom. To enhance geographical thinking in the classroom the Curriculum Making model requires three essential elements to be in balance: the geographical content, teacher choices and student experiences. Through the analysis of an artefact, this paper also discusses teachers’ important role in making decisions as a curriculum maker in the classroom to allow geographical thinking to happen in the classroom."

Disaster prevention literacies: Assessing the knowledge, skills and attitude of Taiwanese students for an earthquake disaster

"Natural disaster education can play a very important role in mediating the impact of natural disasters. If it is imparted at an early age, it could yield positive results such as reducing the risks and consequences of natural disasters. In Taiwan, disaster prevention literacy begins in elementary schools. A disaster prevention framework requires all schools to impart citizens with knowledge about earthquakes, the skills to act and respond appropriately when disaster strikes, and the attitudes necessary for preparedness. Although the implementation of the framework helps equip citizens with these three integral domains of disaster prevention literacy, it is worth examining if Taiwanese citizens are in possession of the necessary knowledge about earthquakes or have the skills to act and respond appropriately to earthquakes based on their school education. This study is based on questionnaire survey data to evaluate if the implementation of the disaster prevention framework plays a vital role in Taiwan’s disaster education. The results reflect that the framework to nurture disaster prevention literacy is successful and could serve as a model to be followed by earthquake-prone countries where people’s preparedness for earthquakes is problematic."

Designing Classrooms of the Future Now!

"Keywords: classroom design, innovation, learning environments In this article we showcase the work of three teachers in redesigning classroom learning environments to enhance student learning. Through short interview excerpts, a video, and classroom photos we feature ten design ideas they used to redesign their classrooms. In the article we also argue that despite lofty rhetoric espousing pedagogical innovation and 21st century learning, classroom design provides the most visible sign of what schools and educational leaders actually believe and value. We call for greater attention to the ways classroom spaces constrain and enable teaching and learning that can better support important 21st century educational outcomes. "

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An Inspiring Quote

"[Open-mindedness] includes an active desire to listen to more sides than one; to give heed to facts from whatever source they come; to give full attention to alternative possibilities; to recognize the possibility of error even in the beliefs that are dearest to us."

~ John Dewey, How We Think

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