Junior College

Economic Pragmatism and the ‘Schooling’ of Girls in Singapore

"Women in Singapore today are considered by many to be modern, liberated and progressive. They have been accorded many opportunities for education and employment since the 1960s and appear to have made great strides in many areas of economic and social life in Singapore. An official survey outlined women’s socio-economic and educational achievements in Singapore between 1987 and 1997 thus (Department of Statistics, 1998, p.1) "

‘Little India’: Diverging Destinies in Heritage Spaces

"As a colonial legacy of the spatial and political management of immigrant groups, Little India has evolved during Singapore’s post-independence era to service the needs of a developing community. While closely identified as an ‘Indian’ space by Indian Singaporeans, it has developed significant appeal to other locals and foreign tourists, as well as migrant workers from South Asia."

Anxieties Over Singapore Students’ Conceptions About History and The Past

"Understanding history can be an intellectually challenging task for many students in schools. It requires students to contemplate issues, events and people who had lived in the distant past and who are often far removed (from them) in time and familiarity. Such challenges, however, have seldom been satisfactorily addressed in many history classrooms in Singapore. "

Review Essay Of “Jacques de Coutre’s And Matelieff’s Singapore and Johor”: Exploring Sources On Pre-Modern History of Singapore

"The education and awareness of the pre-Rafflesian Singapore history has seen much progress since the turn of the millennium. First, there is the publication of Early Singapore 1300-1819: evidence in maps, text and artefacts and Iberians in the Singapore-Melaka area and adjacent regions: 16th to 18th century in 2004. In 2009, the publication of Singapore: a 700-year history, Sino-Malay trade and diplomacy from the tenth through the fourteenth century and Singapore and Melaka Straits: violence, security and diplomacy in the 17th century provide the general public and the specialists alike a chance to explore the subject comprehensively or delve into the China-Malay Archipelago relations in the post Classical period as well as the relations between European empires and native powers in the Western Malay Archipelago in the early modern period. "

Why Singapore Succeeded: Applying the Acemoglu and Robinson-Sachs Debate

"Why are some nations rich and some poor? Who are the winners and losers of colonialism and why? These questions have recently gained much attention, not only amongst historians but also economists who are now looking into global history to provide a fuller understanding of why and how had nations developed. One of the most recent works was Why Nations Fail by economist Daron Acemoglu and political economist James Robinson."

Impacts of the development of tourist facilities on the transition of villages: A case study of Gubugklakah Village, Malang, Indonesia

"Gubugklakah village is located in eastern Malang, Indonesia. The settlement grows along the main road towards the Bromo Tengger Semeru National Park (TNBTS). This village has high economic potential because of the tourism activities. Lembaga Desa Wisata (LADESTA) is a local community formed in 2009 that initiated the status transition of Gubugklakah into Gubugklakah Tourism Village. This research study focuses on the development of tourist facilities in Gubugklakah. Tourist facilities are categorized as primary, secondary and conditional facilities in order to determine and analyse development since the status of the community changed. The method used was a descriptive spatial analysis based on a field survey that included observations and interviews. The results of this study indicate that the number of primary, secondary and conditional tourist facilities is increasing and the facilities are developed linearly along the main road of TNBTS. Furthermore, secondary facilities established by local people, such as restaurants, hotels, and shopping centres, also help the economy in Gubugklakah Tourism Village."

Negotiating the Role of the (Beginning) Teacher in the Classroom

"Teachers play an important role in enacting the curriculum for their students, but teachers’ classroom practice is affected by a multiplicity of influences. This paper reflects on the role of teachers’ subject knowledge in their practice of geography in Singapore classrooms. In addition, it also applies a post-modern analysis of power to this knowledge-practice relationship, suggesting that many beginning teachers may not be able to draw on their subject knowledge due to other more powerful influences on their teaching."

The “rightful place” of Physical Geography in Singapore’s School Geography Curriculum

"The role of physical geography within geography, its relationship to human geography, as well as its similarities and differences to the study of science have been topics of intense debate in geography. This article engages these debates as they apply to geography education in a highly urban Singapore context and argues that the nexus of physical and human geography provides students with the type of knowledge that best prepares them to be concerned and informed global citizens."

Radicalization of Geographical Education in Singapore through Powerful Knowledge and Powerful Pedagogy

"Debate about the purpose of a geography education is often related to what should be included and emphasised in the curriuclum. This article considers Young’s (2010) conceptualisation of powerful knowledge and reflects on its relationship to pedagogy. More specifically, it considers if students’ knowledge should be part of the formal curriculum."

Concepts as the Grammar of Geography: A Reflection

"Geographical concepts are an important means of organising an otherwise long and unconnected list of geographical places, names and topics, and arguably provide geographers with a “grammar” with which to give order to geographical content. This paper reflects on the usefulness and applicability of such a conceptual approach to teaching geography in the Singapore classroom."

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An Inspiring Quote

"[Open-mindedness] includes an active desire to listen to more sides than one; to give heed to facts from whatever source they come; to give full attention to alternative possibilities; to recognize the possibility of error even in the beliefs that are dearest to us."

~ John Dewey, How We Think

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