Conceptual Teaching in Primary Social Studies: Teaching the Primary Three Reader,“Making the Little Red Dot Blue and Brown” in a Conceptual Way, pp. 10 of 10

Lesson Number/Time/

Key Question

Suggested Teaching Activity

Resource

1 (30 min)

 

What is a resource?

Why are water and energy precious?

 

Introduction (10 min)

  1. Using the concept attainment strategy, show pictures of examples and non-examples of resources in alternate fashion.
  2. Inform pupils that the examples have something in common (Note: An essential attribute of the concept of resource is  usefulness to people).
  3. Ask some pupils to provide their own examples and name and define the concept which they have identified.
  4. Conduct a class discussion to get pupils to explain how the examples are linked to the identified concept.  
  5. Provide a formal definition of the concept of resource.

Development (15 min)

  1. Focus class attention on two examples of resources: water and energy (as these are in the reader in focus).
  2. Explain what are energy sources (as these may be unfamiliar to pupils).
  3. Using the Taba Generalisation Strategy, get the class to work in 8 groups: 4 groups will work on water and the other 4 groups will work on energy sources. Groups will use teacher-provided resources to find out why water and energy sources are precious to people. Pupils are to do their work on mahjong paper.
  4. Call on some groups to present.
  5. Provide feedback and add onto pupil responses when necessary.    

Conclusion (5 min)

  1. Sum up by listing the reasons why water and energy sources are precious resources to people.
  2. Reiterate the main teaching points of Lesson 1.

Slides with pictures on examples and non-examples

Slides on concept and definition

 

Slides with pictures on energy sources (eg: oil, natural gas, coal)
Teacher-provided resources
Mahjong paper Coloured markers
Blue tac/Masking tape

Slides for conclusion

2 (30 min)

  • Where does water in Singapore come from?

 

  • Why is it important to conserve water in Singapore? 

 

 

 

Introduction (5 min)

  1. Recapitulate the main teaching points in Lesson 1.
  2. State lesson objectives and key questions.

Development (20 min)

  1. Using the Taba Generalisation Strategy, inform class that they have to answer the worksheet questions which are based on the PUB video on “Singapore Water Story” (4: 11,  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BGUT7BjPl0):
  • What are the four water taps for Singapore?
  • Why is it important to conserve water? 
  1. Elicit some pupil responses.
  2. Provide feedback and add onto pupil responses when necessary.

Conclusion (5 min)

  1. Summarise the main teaching points of Lesson 2.

Slides for introduction

Worksheets
Video-clip

 

 

 

Slides for conclusion

3 (30 min)

  • How is electricity in Singapore generated? 

 

 

  • Why is it important to conserve electricity and energy sources in Singapore?

 

Introduction (5 min)

  1. Recapitulate the main teaching points in Lesson 2.
  2. State lesson objectives and key questions.

Development (20 min)

  1. Using the Taba Generalisation Strategy, inform pupils that they have to answer the worksheet questions which are based on the YouTube video on “Where Does Electricity Come From?” (1: 33, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duVhnEfbTP0):

    • How is electricity generated?
    • What are the energy sources for generating electricity?
    • Why is it important to conserve electricity and energy sources?
  2. Elicit some pupil responses.
  3. Provide feedback and add onto pupil responses when necessary.
  4. Inform class that Singapore does not have energy sources of its own, hence, we have to purchase them from overseas. In the past, we depended on oil to generate our electricity but since 2008, we have switched to natural gas as it is a cleaner energy source than oil (MEWR, 2016).  

Conclusion (5 min)

  1. Summarise the main teaching points of Lesson 3.

Slides for introduction

Worksheets
Video-clip

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Slides for conclusion

4 (30 min)

 

  • What are the different types of waste produced in Singapore?

 

  • How is waste disposed in Singapore?

 

 

 

  • Why is it important to reduce waste production in Singapore?

 

Introduction (10 min)

  1. Using the concept attainment strategy, provide each group with pictures showing different types of waste without telling them that they are all examples of the concept of waste.
  2. Ask class what do all the pictures have in common and provide a label for the concept. 
  3. Instruct groups to categorise the pictures into sub-groups (e.g: paper, glass, plastic, food, electronic products, metal products, clothes/cloth, etc) and name the sub-groups.
  4. Ask class to justify the labels for the sub-groups.

Development (15 min)

  1. Inform class that our waste production has increased many folds from 1200 tonnes (1970) to 7600 tonnes (2010) (MEWR, 2016).
    (Note: I ton is 1000 kilogrammes)
  2. Ask pupils how is waste disposed in Singapore.
  3. Using the Taba Generalisation Strategy, get the class to work in 8 groups: 4 groups will work on incineration and the other 4 groups will work on landfill using teacher-provided resources  (http://www.mewr.gov.sg/topic/incineration and http://www.mewr.gov.sg/topic/landfill). Pupils will do their work on mahjong paper.
  4. Call on some groups to present.
  5. Provide feedback and add onto pupil responses when necessary.
  6. Ask the class what would happen if we do not reduce our waste production.  

Conclusion (5 min)

  1. Summarise the main teaching points of Lesson 4.

 

Packs of picture cards

 

 

Slide with infographic on waste production (by MEWR)
Teacher-provided resources
Mahjong paper
Coloured markers
Blue tac/Masking tape

 

 

Slides for conclusion

5 (60 min)

What can we do to protect our environment?    

 

Introduction (10 min)

  1. Quiz pupils on their previous learning on human impacts on people and environment when resources are not conserved and waste is not reduced.
  2. Ask pupils to make a statement (generalisation) showing the relationship between human actions and impacts.
    (Note: Prompt them with fill in the blanks and helping words:
    Human actions can have negative impacts on people and the environment.) 

Development (10 min: Reading + 20 min: Activity + 15 min: Presentation)

  1. Refer to the reader, “Making the Little Red Dot Blue and Brown” and ask the class to guess what the red little dot, blue and brown mean before reading page 1.
  2. Ask class to make some guesses of how Ranjit, his family and classmates have contributed towards environment protection in terms of conservation of water and electricity/energy sources and waste reduction.
  3. Using the Taba Generalisation Strategy and the reader, get pupils to work in 6 groups to find out what Ranjit and company actually have done: 2 groups will focus on conservation of electricity/energy sources (pp 2 to 9), 2 groups will focus on water conservation (pp 2 to 3, 10 to 13) and 2 groups will focus on waste reduction (pp 14 to 17) and record their findings on mahjong paper.
  4. Call on some groups to present.
  5. Provide feedback and add onto pupil responses when necessary.

Conclusion (5 min)

  1. Conclude with emphasis of main teaching points:
  • Resources are precious.
  • Human actions can have negative impacts on people and the environment.
  • Everyone has a responsibility to protect the environment through conservation of resources and waste reduction.
  1. Assign homework for pupils to write down three things they can do at home and in school to conserve resources and reduce waste.

 

Slides with quiz questions

 

 

 

Reader
Mahjong paper
Coloured markers
Blue tac/Masking tape

 

 

 

 

 

Slides for conclusion

An Inspiring Quote

"[Open-mindedness] includes an active desire to listen to more sides than one; to give heed to facts from whatever source they come; to give full attention to alternative possibilities; to recognize the possibility of error even in the beliefs that are dearest to us."

~ John Dewey, How We Think

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