A Dialogic Teaching Approach: Talk Moves to Deepen Students’ Understanding in the Geography Classroom, pp. 5 of 12

With particular attention to turns 15 and 17, it can be seen that prompts by the teacher elicited single-word replies from students. The consequent environment created in the classroom due to the fixed IRF sequences led to low levels in the quality of student participation. This was also mentioned in Dillion’s (1985) work where he concluded that question sequences posed in the fixed IRF format resulted in the lack of student active engagement.

Furthermore, in the interactive and authoritative communication approach, the classroom interaction sequences flowed through a more authoritative discourse where the direction was already set in advance by the teacher. With particular reference to turns 25 (Except 2) and 43 (Excerpt 3), it can be seen that the teacher focuses on one specific point of view and leads the students through a question and response routine and heads towards the goal to establish and consolidate that point of view.

Excerpt 2:

23

Teacher

When the water evaporates it will condense and fall as rain right?

I

24

Student C

(Silence)

25

Teacher

So rather than saying the weather is too hot, can we focus on the rainfall?

F–I

26

Student D

Maybe it rains lesser.

R

27

Teacher

 (Approving nod) Maybe there is less rain. For some reason, it does not rain as much. (Writes ‘low rainfall’ on board)

F

 

Excerpt 3:

39

Teacher

What else? (Where do you think the waste come from?)

I

40

Student I

Factories.

R

41

Teacher

Okay. How do factories pollute the water?

F–I

42

Student J

Oil.

R

43

Teacher

Factories can pollute by throwing their chemical waste into the river… or oil as well. (writes ‘oil spilage’ on board) So when we say factories oil spilage right, what kind of industries is it? Starts with ‘i’.

F–I

44

Student K

Industrial.

R

45

Teacher

Yes. (Writes ‘industrial waste’ on the board)

F

An Inspiring Quote

"[Open-mindedness] includes an active desire to listen to more sides than one; to give heed to facts from whatever source they come; to give full attention to alternative possibilities; to recognize the possibility of error even in the beliefs that are dearest to us."

~ John Dewey, How We Think

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