A Dialogic Teaching Approach: Talk Moves to Deepen Students’ Understanding in the Geography Classroom, pp. 9 of 12

Authority and power

Referring to the excerpt from Excerpt 6 below, Tim took his role as a student-teacher very seriously and even paused to explicitly check for understanding during the course of his explanations (turns 80 and 82). When the teacher set up the environment for student-initiated talk in the classroom, it transferred some of the position of authority to the student-teacher. As the status of superiority is spread out (not placed entirely on the teacher), this created a non-threatening environment to discover and engage in dialogue. This is evidenced from the questions that students posed that were spontaneous in nature and which sparked genuine eagerness to learn more.

Excerpt 6:

 

Teacher

Okay, Mr Tim! Come up and explain please. (How does cloud cover influence temperature?)

I

78

Tim

Hello class. Today we are going to talk about cloud covers. So we have the presence of clouds and the absence of clouds.  During daytime, when there is clouds right, the sun actually produces short wave radiation. So during daytime, when the sun produces short wave radiation, some of them will be reflected from the cloud and… reflected back into space. While there are also some short wave radiation that passes through the cloud – that passes through some space in the cloud. Thus, the temperature is higher, as compared to the absence of cloud. Because when the… (pause)

R

79

Class

(slight mumbling)

80

Tim

Oh wait. Lower, lower, lower… I meant lower, as compared to the absence of cloud because when there are no clouds right, short wave radiation passes through because there are no clouds causing the temperature to become higher. Do you understand? For the daytime? Understand ah guys? Understand or not?

R–I

81

Student A

Yes.

R

82

Tim

Now, for nighttime.  During nighttime, short wave radiation will be converted to long wave radiation. Which longwave radiation from the ground will… err… reflect back into the space. So when there are clouds right… night time there is no sun, so the only heat that is radiated is long wave radiation. So at night when there are clouds right, the clouds will actually absorb the long wave radiation, that will cause the temperature to be higher.

 

But when there are no clouds, the long wave radiation will directly go back to space. Which means, the temperature is lower.

 

So that is the difference between the presence of clouds and the absence of clouds. Can understand or not?

R–I

83

Teacher

Mr. Tim, where does the long wave radiation come from?

I

84

Tim

The… actually the short wave radiation is converted to long wave radiation from the ground.

R

85

Student C

There are clouds in the nightime, why the temperature still higher? [Why is it that when there are clouds at night, the temperature will be higher?]

I

86

Tim

Cause the clouds during nighttime, they actually absorb heat from the longwave radiation. That’s why the temperature is higher.

R

87

Student D

In the daytime, the clouds reflect shortwave radiation. Then how come nighttime the clouds do not reflect longwave radiation? [Why is it that the clouds do not reflect longwave radiation during nighttime?]

I

88

Tim

The reason being is that longwave radiation is already from the ground, thus it cannot be reflected back its just…

R

An Inspiring Quote

"[Open-mindedness] includes an active desire to listen to more sides than one; to give heed to facts from whatever source they come; to give full attention to alternative possibilities; to recognize the possibility of error even in the beliefs that are dearest to us."

~ John Dewey, How We Think

Newsletter Subscription

Subscribe to our newsletter and stay up-to-date with new journal issues!